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AirMISR Instrument


The NASA ER-2 aircraft is shown with the AirMISR instrument installed in the nose, undergoing testing. The black object at the bottom surface of the nose is the viewing window for AirMISR. The tall cart on wheels holds equipment used to display images and other AirMISR data after the aircraft lands. It is not flown with the instrument.
AirMISR on the ER-2 Aircraft
JPL image P-48594A
700 x 480, 195 KB jpg
1415 x 970, 4.1 MB tif

The NASA ER-2 aircraft is shown with the AirMISR instrument installed in the nose, undergoing testing. The black object at the bottom surface of the nose is the viewing window for AirMISR. The tall cart on wheels holds equipment used to display images and other AirMISR data after the aircraft lands. It is not flown with the instrument.
Credit: NASA/Caltech/JPL
This shows the AirMISR instrument in the lab. We are looking directly into the face of the instrument, which in flight points downwards to the Earth. The camera is mounted inside the cylinder that has the shiny strip along the left hand side, and looks out through the small opening near the left-hand-side of the cylinder (the opening is dark, and may not be visible on some browsers.) During flight, this cylinder is rotated so that the camera can view Earth at varying angles.
AirMISR Instrument, Front View
JPL image P-28762B
650 x 654, 146 KB jpg
1952 x 1936, 11.3 MB tif

This shows the AirMISR instrument in the lab. We are looking directly into the face of the instrument, which in flight points downwards to the Earth. The camera is mounted inside the cylinder that has the shiny strip along the left hand side, and looks out through the small opening near the left-hand-side of the cylinder (the opening is dark, and may not be visible on some browsers.) During flight, this cylinder is rotated so that the camera can view Earth at varying angles.
Credit: NASA/Caltech/JPL
This shows the AirMISR instrument in the lab with the rear cover off, revealing internal cabling and the back of the camera. They instrument is about 45 cm in diameter.
AirMISR Instrument, Rear View
JPL image P-28762A
650 x 631, 153 KB jpg
2000 x 1940, 11.6 MB tif

This shows the AirMISR instrument in the lab with the rear cover off, revealing internal cabling and the back of the camera. They instrument is about 45 cm in diameter.
Credit: NASA/Caltech/JPL
These members of the MISR team are preparing to make field measurements at Lunar Lake, Nevada, early on the morning of June 5, 1996. Here they are working on a portable instrument that can measure light reflected by the surface in many color bands and at multiple view angles. In the course of the day, they carried this instrument around the test site in a backpack, taking hundreds of images of the surface. During this experiment, they also used instruments that measure sunlight and skylight. Independent field measurements such as these will be used to validate and confirm the data acquired by the spaceborne MISR instrument and the airborne AirMISR instrument.
Validation Field Measurements at Lunar Lake
JPL image P-48455A
700 x 460, 139 KB jpg
2892 x 1900, 16.5 MB tif

These members of the MISR team are preparing to make field measurements at Lunar Lake, Nevada, early on the morning of June 5, 1996. Here they are working on a portable instrument that can measure light reflected by the surface in many color bands and at multiple view angles. In the course of the day, they carried this instrument around the test site in a backpack, taking hundreds of images of the surface. During this experiment, they also used instruments that measure sunlight and skylight. Independent field measurements such as these will be used to validate and confirm the data acquired by the spaceborne MISR instrument and the airborne AirMISR instrument.
Credit: NASA/Caltech/JPL