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Larry Di Girolamo

Larry Di Girolamo -
Contact Info:
Department of Atmospheric Sciences
105 South Gregory Street
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, IL 61801
Phone: 217.333.3080
Biography:

Larry Di Girolamo received the B.Sc. (Hons.) degree in astrophysics from Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, in 1989 and the M. Sc. and Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from McGill University, Montreal, Canada, in 1992 and 1996, respectively. In 1998, he became a faculty member of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, where he is currently an Associate Professor. He teaches introductory courses on atmospheric science and advanced courses on satellite remote sensing and radiative transfer. His research interests include the remote sensing of cloud and aersosol properties, cloud-aerosol-climate interactions, 3-D radiative transfer through heterogeneous cloud fields, and sampling strategies for remotely sensed data. He has been actively studying multi-angle remote sensing techniques since 1990 and he officially became a member of the MISR Science Team in 2000. Past service includes Editor for the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology (2004-2007), Guest Editor for Remote Sensing of Environment's Special Issue on MISR (2005-2006), Co-Chair of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing's Working Group on the Atmosphere, Climate and Weather Research (2004-2007), and member of the AMS Scientific and Technological Activities Commission on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography (1999-2002).



Science Team